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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

REDD+ versus indigenous people

Why a tribe in Panama rejected pay for their carbon-rich forests. Panama's efforts to gain funding for standing forests roiled by indigenous opposition.

"I have struggled to tell this story in ways that make sense to average readers who understand little about carbon markets and the magnitude of REDD+. One personal goal is to explain the Kuna perspective on REDD+ and their opposition — which is why you see in the piece a focus on them, and not on the REDD+ program per se. I consciously left a lot of the inside-baseball details out, the back-and-forth, because I simply find it not only confusing to the reader, but not relevant to the issue at hand, which was, why did the Kuna (from their perspective, from what they know and what many people told me) reject REDD+? Also, the piece aims to tell a human narrative, and not be a technical report." Ruxandra Guidi

More… Sep 09, 2014

Biocultural community protocols and the future of conservation

To appreciate the momentousness of the Khoe protocol, it would be important to put it in the context of the larger law and policy debates around biodiversity conservation and community rights.

More… Sep 09, 2014

‘Trespassing’, collecting honey among charges against Nagarahole tribal people

The State actively prosecutes but ‘Prosecuting them for using forest violates Forest Rights Act’

Between 2001 and 2011, as many as 192 cases were registered against tribal communities living in and around Nagarahole National Park. But their “offences”, which include trespassing forest land, collecting honey and growing ginger in the forest, are, in fact, their rights enshrined in the Forest Rights Act.

More… Sep 06, 2014

ICCA Alert: Consortium appeals to the Tanzanian authorities

"No eviction of Uvinje villagers. Respect communities sensitive to conservation."

This Consortium alert involves Uvinje, a small, coastal sub-village of Saadani Village, north of Dar es Salaam, in Tanzania. The residents of Uvinje face forced eviction from their land and homes because the Tanzania National Park Authority (TANAPA) has redrawn its boundary lines and unilaterally gazetted Uvinje’s present and ancestral lands to extend the coverage of Saadani National Park.

More… Aug 27, 2014

A Model for Community-Based tourism Through Violence and Dispossession

An update from Susanna Nordlund's blog - More About Thomson Safaris’ “Enashiva” in Loliondo - In memory of Moringe ole Parkipuny, sadly missed for one year now.

There have been some meetings. In a meeting with the District Commissioner an agreement was made that cows and herders will no longer be harassed on the occupied land, but will graze freely. What happened when Olunjai Timan was shot because of Thomson Safaris’ occupation of Maasai land. And a reminder of what the “philanthropic” land grabber has been doing during these years.

More… Jul 24, 2014

Responding to the Threat of Organized Crime to Wildlife and People

A response to Rosaleen Duffy by Michael Painter, Director, Conservation and the Quality of Human Life Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)

International conservation organizations have responded to the expansion of globally organized wildlife crime by attempting to promote more effective law enforcement at all levels of the international trade chain for illegal wildlife products. Concern that an emphasis on wildlife crime risks militarizing conservation efforts, and creating situations where the need for stronger law enforcement could be invoked as cover for repressive actions against local people, has been thoughtfully articulated in a recent contribution, by Professor Rosaleen Duffy, here on Just Conservation. While some of the specific issues she raises need to be considered in a broader context, the main point of her article is a valid one. Conservation organizations seeking to address the threat of organized crime to wildlife and people have the responsibility to ensure that appropriate safeguards are in place to protect the rights of people affected by efforts to halt organized poaching.

More… Jul 21, 2014

Forget the war for biodiversity, it’s just war.

A contributed essay from Professor Rosaleen Duffy, Professor of Political Ecology of Development, SOAS, University ofLondon.

Conservationists are facing some difficult and critically important choices over how to conserve elephants and rhinos in the wake of a rapid rise in poaching. But there appears to be a rush towards more militarised responses, which intersect with the strategic aims of the US-led ‘War on Terror’. Elephants and rhinos themselves may be fast becoming the latest weapon in this war. This is not ‘back to the barriers’, which implies a defensive position - it is an ‘offensive’ position extending well beyond protected areas. It could easily lead to an escalation of violence that will undermine decades of work with local communities, and it runs counter to the Conservation Initiative on Human Rights.

More… Jul 14, 2014

Herder Shot Because of the “Philanthropic” Thomson Safaris – and Other Loliondo Land Threat News

Olonjai Timan was shot by a policeman working for Thomson Safaris. I’m having problems getting updates about the cases against herders accused by Thomson, but am waiting to hear a sentence today (11th July). I’m also having problems getting updates about OBC.

More… Jul 12, 2014