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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

Land grabbing: the new tragedy of the commons

A contributed article written for Just Conservation by environmental journalist and writer Fred Pearce

"Poor rural Africa is one of the last great unfenced areas of the planet, where humans and wildlife still often live side by side. The World Bank calls the four million square kilometres of savannah grasslands in Africa, between the rainforest and the deserts, “the world’s last large reserve of underused land". The model for what the World Bank thinks should happen to the African savannah is to be found in Brazil – in the cerrado, a huge region of grassland and bush that rings the Amazon. Thirty years ago, it was largely empty, probably the most biodiverse grassland in the world. Now it is being gobbled up faster than the Amazon."

More… Jul 11, 2012

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON RIO+20 AND MOTHER EARTH

The Green Economy is nothing more than capitalism of nature;..

"We continue to inhabit and maintain the last remaining sustainable ecosystems and biodiversity hotspots in the world. We can contribute substantially to sustainable development but we believe that a holistic ecosystem framework for sustainable development should be promoted. This includes the integration of the human-rights based approach, ecosystem approach and culturally sensitive and knowledge-based approaches."

More… Jun 23, 2012

Protecting Indigenous Rights In Climate Policy

The Indian Law Resource Center Releases International Law Principles for REDD+

We’ve already seen indigenous communities violently expelled from their lands, or swindled by land speculators into signing away access to their forest resources through REDD+ projects. If REDD+ initiatives do not have strong policies preventing this type of abuse, violations will only get worse as more money is invested in REDD+.

More… Jun 15, 2012

WWF Helps Industry More than Environment

The WWF is the most powerful environmental organization in the world but a closer look at its work leads to a sobering conclusion: Many of its activities benefit industry more than the environment or endangered species.

Can the WWF truly protect nature against human beings? Or do the organization's attractive posters merely offer the illusion of help? Fifty years after the organization was founded, there are growing doubts as to the independence of the WWF and its business model, which involves partnering with industry to protect nature.

More… Jun 02, 2012

Displaced - The Human Cost of Development and Resettlement

Vivid first-hand accounts by the displaced themselves, gathered by Panos London and partners in Africa and Asia.

The six case-studies that form the core of the book feature the voices of men and women displaced by the Tarbela Dam in Pakistan, pastoralists in Kenya displaced by agricultural and conservation initiatives, groups of San in Botswana and Namibia resettled as a result of government schemes and conservation policies, farming families in India who lost their land and livelihoods to coalmining, and mountain villagers in Lesotho, resettled by the Lesotho Highlands Water Project. By bringing together these individual experiences, the book reveals the loss of cultural continuity and identity, shifts in family responsibilities and gender roles, and fractured relationships between generations that are just some of the complex challenges people face as they attempt to rebuild lives and communities. Although these narratives are suffused with regret and a sense of loss, they also demonstrate resourcefulness and resilience in the face of profound change. Development's social cost continues to be under-reported; these stories are a crucial reminder of its often devastating consequences.

More… May 16, 2012

Who then are WWF accountable to?

An opinion piece contributed by Dale Stiller, secretary of Property Rights Australia.

"...The issue of accountability is thorny for NGOs. The expectation that an environmental NGO should provide a vaguely described “public good” often results in their clients being loosely defined as sectors of society or the society as a whole. Unless, an NGO has a very specific and defined mandate with a target population, its client base will be so broad that it’s almost impossible to judge whether it is being responsive to its intended clients. In effect, there are often no specific clients to hold an NGO accountable”

More… May 15, 2012

Video - 'Suits and Savages - Why the World Bank Won't Save the Tiger.'

A video contribution from film maker Zoe Young

"Our film Suits and Savages is over ten years old now, but unfortunately the story we told is still happening again and again: Forest after forest enclosed, fund after environmental fund wasted, people after people losing lands and culture and wildlife still losing ground"

More… Feb 19, 2012

There's More to Conservation Than Tigers and Pandas

"Despite the millions donated to multi-national conservation NGOs, they continue to fail to even save those species that undoubtedly pull in most of their funds."

From Sophie Pritchard "Little plug for Just Conservation in this blog:-.."

More… Feb 08, 2012