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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

Rights Based Approach to Conservation

The aim is for this platform to become a central point for collecting and sharing information and experiences about worldwide initiatives which promote the integration of human rights considerations within conservation practices.

"Failure to conserve biodiversity can undermine the rights of the individuals and local communities.."

More… Jan 14, 2011

Ensuring ‘Just’ Conservation?

Do conservation organisations need a code of conduct? A contributed discussion from Jo Woodman and Gordon Bennett

"The big conservation organizations have committed themselves to respect indigenous rights in a multitude of policies and statements. None of these are binding...."

More… Jan 12, 2011

Seeking New Paths to Conservation

Draft background paper - Seeking New Paths to Conservation Workshop, "SHARING POWER" Conference (January 2011)

This paper is intended to provoke discussion and generate better, shared understanding of the problems, the opportunities, and the options for nurturing concrete actions toward more socially-just and ecologically-sustainable conservation and development in significantly-large, geographically-defined places. The aim is to brainstorm ways to re-vision conservation as an integrated principle of "development", not conservation as set-asides nor partnerships with development plans and agents responsible for environmental damages and human rights violations. Please send comments, corrections, suggestions and additional information to janisalcorn@yahoo.com DRAFT 10 DECEMBER 2010

More… Dec 11, 2010

Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas - ICCAs

A Bold New Frontier for Conservation

"ICCAs are natural and/or modified ecosystems containing significant biodiversity values, ecological services and cultural values, voluntarily conserved by Indigenous peoples and local communities..."

More… Oct 15, 2010

Conservation, Human Rights and Poverty Reduction

A progress report of an ongoing debate

Abstract In the context of the World Parks Congress and the World Conservation Conference much has been written about conservation, human rights and poverty reduction. While the debate has been productive, it has paid remarkably little attention to the problems of eviction from protected areas. Many protected areas in poor countries still contain people and a challenge facing conservationists is how to deal with future moves to displace people from existing protected areas as legislation tightens. We suggest three principles which will be useful as these developments unfold; 1) that the social impacts of protected areas need to be carefully monitored; 2) broadening our concerns to address the needs of all local communities, not just indigenous peoples; and 3) understanding the ecologies and social impacts of co-existence could win more land for conservation purposes than currently found in protected areas.

More… Sep 18, 2010

CIHR - THE CONSERVATION INITIATIVE ON HUMAN RIGHTS

"The pursuit of conservation goals can contribute positively to the realization of many human rights, and realization of rights can enable more effective conservation outcomes."

This is the text of the CIHR principles as published on the IUCN website

More… Sep 18, 2010

DISOBEDIENT KNOWLEDGE

Problematizing Neoliberal Biodiversity Conservation: Displaced and Disobedient Knowledge

Abstract This workshop brought together a global network of scholars, applied practitioners, and community activists (recognizing that these are not mutually exclusive categories), who are concerned about the ways in which nature has been commodified and appropriated in the contextof biodiversity conservation, and the ways in which local people and their livelihoods have been displaced and transformed in the process. Members of this group have documented these processes in many different parts of the world, but have experienced significant obstacles to making our analysis part of mainstream conversations about biodiversity conservation. We came together in order to more effectively conceptualize and communicate the global nature of the phenomena that we have researched, experienced and documented. The three-day workshop revolved around the experiential narratives of participants, structured according to key questions agreed upon prior to the event. From these narratives we identified common themes, as well as significant differences, and sought to identify variables that might account for these. We also worked together to think through the most effective avenues for highlighting these problems and considering solutions. These included strengthening existing networks of scholars, practitioners, activists, and local people who are concerned with the displacement effects of conservation policy and practice, as well as the creation of new ones. We also hope to build on the unique skills and perspectives of network members to explore solutions to environmental problems that are holistic, inclusive, equitable, and ecologically sound. A major element of this vision is a multifaceted publication and information-sharing strategy, including the creation of an interactive online forum to allow for freer and more inclusive exchanges of information and ideas. Our vision is that these networks and forums will inform and influence a convergence of biodiversity conservation and environmental justice in which equity and ecology are inextricably linked.

More… Sep 18, 2010