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A network for all who care about the conservation of our world and who want to see it achieved with justice, compassion, dignity and honesty.

August 2011 Archives

The hunting of bushmeat

Neo-colonial conservation or wise custodianship?

"It is a historical fact that biodiversity is declining not because of subsistence hunting, but from the destruction of ecosystems by extractive industries and industrial agricultural, so called 'development'"

More… Aug 20, 2011

Tenure and Indigenous Peoples

The Importance Of Self-Determination, Territory, And Rights To Land And Other Natural Resources Property

In Africa, state-led conservation has a history of violating due process rights of local occupants, forced resettlements, destruction of property and farms, and even torture and extrajudicial killings. Estimates have placed the global number of conservation refugees at 130 million

More… Aug 20, 2011

The Martyrdom of Shehla Masood

IUCN and big business - Statement on the Martyrdom of Shehla Masood

We salute the struggle and martyrdom of Shehla Masood who defended our forests, rivers, land and wildlife in the face of unscrupulous corporate assault in nexus with ruling political regimes. Shehla Masood used to conclude her messages with a proud “Roarrrrr” that cannot be silenced by the bullets of her assailants.

More… Aug 18, 2011

Racism and Conservation

Towards a better understanding human-wildlife conflict: Re-visiting common assumptions. A contribution for discussion from Clare Gupta

This article stands as a critique of the neo-colonial attitudes of many conservation scientists, but it also serves as a call for members of the conservation community to recognize that those who care about conservation need to pay as close attention to the intricacies of social life as to the complexities of wildlife ecology in places where humans and wildlife co-exist.

More… Aug 15, 2011

New threats to both conservation and indigenous groups in Southwest Ethiopia.

From Gambella Zone to South Omo Zone, Indian, Italian, Malaysian, Saudi and Korean companies are clearing land and pushing aside indigenous farmers and pastoralists

The Omo National Park will lose more than 80,000 hectares of land and the Mago National Park 33,000 hectares to the plantations. The Lower Omo Valley was declared an UNESCO World Heritage site in 1980.

More… Aug 02, 2011